two-step sequential procedure for improving the cumulative probability of detection in radars
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two-step sequential procedure for improving the cumulative probability of detection in radars

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Published by Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radar.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementby L.E. Brennan and F.S. Hill, Jr.
SeriesResearch memorandum -- RM-4338, Research memorandum (Rand Corporation) -- RM-4338..
ContributionsHill, F. S.
The Physical Object
Pagination60 p. :
Number of Pages60
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17984312M

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Sequential detection procedures, which may be used with phased-array radars, can provide a significant improvement in search capability as compared to uniform scanning. This paper discusses the improvement in cumulative detection probability (the probability that an approaching target is detected before it reaches a given range) which can be obtained with the two-step sequential test, first described by Finn . A Two-Step Sequential Procedure for Improving the Cumulative Probability of Detection in Radars This report is part of the RAND Corporation research memorandum by: Abstract. The typical approach in change-point theory is to perform the statistical analysis based on a sample of fixed size. Alternatively, and this is our approach, one observes some random phenomenon sequentially and takes action as soon as one observes some statistically significant deviation from the “normal” by: 4. “A Two-Step Sequential Procedure for Improving the Cumulative Probability of Detection in Radars,” (with L.E. Brennan), IEEE Transactions on Military Electronics, MIL-9, July , pp.

PDF | On , K. ka and others published Pulse Compression Techniques for Target Detection | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate. In a variety of different settings cumulative sum (CUSUM) procedures have been applied for the sequential detection of structural breaks in the parameters of stochastic models. Yet their performance depends strongly on the time of change and is best under early change scenarios. For later changes their finite sample behavior is rather questionable. In this article a method is presented for evaluating the probability of detecting (PD) a single stuck-fault in a sequential circuit as a function of the number of random input test vectors. A discrete parameter Markov-model is used in the analysis to obtain closed-form expressions for PD. The circuit is partitioned into three parts, the input and output combinational logic and the . To calculate the probability of detection actually achieved, the power of the sea clutter received in a single resolution cell must be added to the noise power. Initially we can consider that the expected signal has gain G c over sea clutter. This gain is not linked to the total number of pulses, N, post-integrated during illumination time, but is limited to the number, N f, of pulses of a.

CUMULATIVE SUM CHART AND THE SEQUENTIAL PROBABILITY RATIO TEST Aleksey S. Polunchenko Department of Mathematical Sciences, State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton Binghamtom, NY –, USA Abstract We establish a simple connection between certain in-control characteristics of the CUSUM Run Length and their out-of-control. Alert–confirm detection is a highly efficient method to improve phased array radar search performance. It comprises sequential detection in two steps: alert detection. A Two-Step Sequential Procedure for Improving the Cumulative Probability of Detection in Radars This report is part of the RAND Corporation research memorandum series. It includes the Marcus and Swerling test strategy and a two-step approximation to sequential detection. The second chapter contains the development of Bayes decision rules and Bayes receivers for optimizing the detection of multiple targets with unknown parameters, such as range, velocity, angle, etc.