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Medical Implications of Biofilms

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Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Medical microbiology & virology,
  • Microbiology (non-medical),
  • Medical Microbiology,
  • Microbial Ecology,
  • Science,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Medical,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - General,
  • Microbiology,
  • Medical / Microbiology,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - Microbiology,
  • Biofilms

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsMichael Wilson (Editor), Deirdre Devine (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages328
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7755382M
ISBN 100521812402
ISBN 109780521812405

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Thus, the question of how to treat biofilm infections extends to many aspects of medicine. Indeed, the issue of biofilm eradication extends way beyond the infected patient, since bacteria in the environment typically exist as biofilms. These are commonly complex multispecies ecosystems associated with protozoa (Brown and Barker, ). As a result of an increased use of implanted medical devices, the incidence of these biofilm-associated diseases is increasing: the non-shedding surfaces of these devices provide ideal substrata for colonisation by biofilm-forming microbes. The consequences of this mode of growth are far-reaching. In medicine, the primary problems are biofilms associated with implants: infections are increasingly difficult to treat with traditional antibiotics and removal of the implant often becomes essential, frequently leading to higher morbidity and mortality. This will be the first book dedicated to medical biofilms. Biofilms can cause a variety of health problems, ranging from a common earache to a specific bacterial infection found in people living with a genetic disease called cystic fibrosis. But biofilms are particularly an area of concern for patients with implanted medical devices.

Biofilms on indwelling medical devices may be composed of gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria or yeasts. Bacteria commonly isolated from these devices include the gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus viridans; and the gram-negative Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, . Accordingly, it is essential to control biofilms and to establish appropriate countermeasures, from both industrial and medical viewpoints. This book offers valuable, detailed information on these countermeasures. It also discusses the fundamentals of biofilms, relates various substrates to biofilms, and presents a variety of biofilm reactors. The vast majority of microbes grow as biofilms in aqueous environments. These biofilms can be benign or pathogenic, releasing harmful products and toxins, which become encased within the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation is a phenomenon that occurs in both natural and man-made environments under diverse conditions. 1. Resistant to cell loss- cells in a biofilm are tightly stuck together, the shearing force of blood urine or other fluids cannot detach the cells 2. Resistant to antibiotics- cells in the interior of a biofilm are inaccessible to antibiotics and/or metabolically dormant - Resistant to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages or neturophils.

This book may be used as a text or reference for everyone interested in biofilms and their applications. It is also highly recommended for environmental microbiologists, soil scientists, medical microbiologists, bioremediation experts, and microbiologists working in biocorrosion, biofouling, biodegradation, water microbiology, quorum sensing, and many other related by: 3. PDF | On Jan 1, , P.N.L. Lens and others published Biofilms in Medicine, Industry and Environmental Biotechnology: Characteristics, Analysis and Control | .   Biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is a complex multi-step process (usually cyclic) involving multiple bacterial ial biofilms secrete a mixture of polysaccharides, proteins (composed primarily of D-amino acids), fatty acids, and a variety of nucleic acids which is referred to as extracellular polymeric substance or EPS [1, 6, 37, 39].Cited by: Human tissues often support large, complex microbial communities growing as biofilms that can cause a variety of infections. As a result of an increased use of implanted medical devices, the incidence of these biofilm-associated diseases is increasing: the non-shedding surfaces of these devices provide ideal substrata for colonisation by biofilm-forming microbes.